Aluminum Forging

Open-die forging
Ideal for processing large pieces of aluminum, open die presses do not constrain the aluminum billet during the forging process and utilize flat dies free of precut profiles and designs. Aluminum blocks weighing up to 200,000 pounds and 80 feet in length can be open-die forged to create large aluminum components with optimal structural integrity. While welding and joining techniques are useful in creating large components, they cannot match the strength or durability of a forged part. Open-die forgings are limited only by the size of the starting stock.

Closed-die forging
Closed-die forging, also known as impression-die forging, can produce an almost limitless variety of shapes that range in weight from mere ounces to more than 25 tons. As the name implies, two or more dies containing impressions are brought together as forging stock undergoes plastic deformation. Because the dies restrict metal flow, this process can yield more complex shapes and closer tolerances than open-die forging. Impression-die forging accounts for the majority of aluminum forging production.

Rolled-ring forging
When industrial applications call for a high strength, circular cross section component, there is no match for rolled-ring forging. The process typically begins with an open-die forging to create a ring preform, shaped like a doughnut. Next, several rollers apply pressure on the preform until the desired wall thickness and height are achieved. Configurations can be flat, like a washer or feature heights of more than 80 inches. Rings can be rolled into numerous sizes, ranging from roller-bearing sleeves to large pressure vessels.